Kingdom Calling vs. Financial Advisors: Hoarding Hurts

March 21, 2009

Financial advisors encourage you to be miserly and have the smallest possible impact on the world. This is the same financial advice given in most churches, either because that advice is coming from lay people or from church members who are practicing “traditional financial planning.” And for a lot of folks it’s not horrible advice, because most Americans, and most Christians for that matter, have a terrible spending problem. So the advice is to scrimp and save.

What has your money done for you lately?

What has your money done for you lately?

Now, saving is important. And not wasting your money frivolously is important. But if that’s where most of your focus goes, you can’t focus on being more productive. If such frivolous spending is a problem, then it needs to be addressed (and sometimes we spend considerable time with clients on this), but once there’s a reasonable amount of discipline here, there is far more that can be accomplished by focusing on producing more with what we have.

So where financial advisors encourage hoarding, Kingdom Calling focuses on cash flow, so your assets can actually send you money instead of giving you only paper gains. Think about it: you can’t eat a paper gain, but you can definitely be hurt by a paper loss. Read the rest of this entry »


Kingdom Calling vs. Financial Advisors: Forfeiting Your Power

March 18, 2009

I feel sorry for most of the common people I hear about who have lost wealth, lost their way, or both in the financial storm we’re currently weathering.

You are your best ally

You are your best ally

“Why cry for those whose fault it is?” I’ve been asked. Certainly these people were at fault.

One can throw blame upon many right now, and that’s not my goal. What’s more important is what has been lost. And I’m not talking about money. That’s easy enough to get back. The worst thing that happened to those who followed the direction of a financial advisor to their present state, is their forfeit of power and self-direction.

This forfeit occurred the first time money and trust were handed to a financial advisor. Which is why the FA/client model is such a bad idea. It teaches you to follow others and their direction, not you and yours. Read the rest of this entry »